top of page

MIMOSA PUDICA

Working with sensitivity.

Mimosa pudica at Modern Ancient Sanctuary in Iquitos, Peru

Mimosa pudica is a small, creeping plant that belongs to the Fabaceae (Legume) family. It is known for its unique reaction to touch or physical stimulation, where its compound leaves fold inward and droop, as if in response to being touched. This characteristic has earned it the commonly known name as the sensitive plant or touch-me-not and a rich history of traditional use.

HISTORY & BACKGROUND

Mimosa pudica has a long history of traditional use in various cultures. In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, it is known as "Lajjalu" and is considered a valuable herb. The roots, leaves, and seeds of Mimosa pudica have been used for their astringent, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. It has been employed to address a range of health concerns, including skin disorders, digestive issues, urinary tract infections, and more.

 

The leaves, roots, and seeds of Mimosa pudica contain various bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, and DMT (dimethyltryptamine) . These constituents contribute to its potential medicinal properties. Mimosa pudica is a plant empirically used in some countries to treat anxiety and depression.

Mimosa pudica at Modern Ancient Sanctuary in Iquitos, Peru

BENEFITS OF MIMOSA PUDICA

The following benefits include, but are not limited to:

 

  • Traditional Tonic: Mimosa pudica has been used as a general tonic to support overall well-being and vitality. It is believed to have rejuvenating and balancing effects on the body.

  • Antioxidant Activity: The presence of flavonoids and other antioxidants in Mimosa pudica contributes to its potential antioxidant activity. Antioxidants help protect the body against oxidative stress and may have beneficial effects on overall health.

  • Anti-inflammatory Properties: Mimosa pudica contains bioactive compounds that exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. It may help reduce inflammation in the body, potentially supporting the management of conditions related to chronic inflammation.

  • Traditional Tonic: Mimosa pudica has been used as a general tonic to support overall well-being and vitality. It is believed to have rejuvenating and balancing effects on the body.

Mimosa pudica at Modern Ancient Sanctuary in Iquitos, Peru

CEREMONY PREPARATION 

As with any plant medicine ceremony, it is important to set your intention. Clarify your intentions and purpose for working with Mimosa Pudica. Reflect on what you hope to gain, heal, or explore during the ceremony. Set clear and positive intentions that align with your personal goals and aspirations.

 

In addition, prepare your mind and body. Engage in practices that promote mental clarity, emotional stability, and physical well-being leading up to the ceremony. These may include meditation, mindfulness exercises, yoga, clean eating, and avoiding substances that may interfere with the experience.

Mimosa pudica at Modern Ancient Sanctuary in Iquitos, Peru

RECOMMENDED MATERIALS

The materials below provide some insight into Mimosa Pudica, and although some are not directly related they provide a useful context in which to understand plant spirit healing.

Reading

  • Medicinal Plants of the Amazon and Andes" by Steve Beyer

  • Rainforest Remedies: 100 Healing Herbs of Belize" by Rosita Arvigo and Michael Balick

  • Ayahuasca Medicine: The Shamanic World of Amazonian Sacred Plant Healing" by Alan Shoemaker

  • Rainforest Home Remedies: The Maya Way to Heal Your Body and Replenish Your Soul" by Rosita Arvigo and Nadine Epstein

  • The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs: A Guide to Understanding and Using Herbal Medicinals" by Leslie Taylor

Documentaries/ Videos

  • "The Sacred Science" (2011) - Directed by Nicholas J. Polizzi, this documentary follows the journey of eight individuals as they embark on a healing retreat deep in the Amazon rainforest. While not solely focused on Mimosa pudica, it offers insights into traditional healing practices and the use of various plant medicines.

  • "Ayahuasca: Vine of the Soul" (2010) - Directed by Richard Meech, this documentary provides an exploration of Ayahuasca and its cultural and spiritual significance. It offers glimpses into traditional ceremonies and the use of plant medicines within indigenous contexts.

  • "The Jungle Prescription" (2011) - Directed by Christopher Hooke, this documentary delves into the work of a Canadian doctor who explores the potential healing properties of Ayahuasca and other plant medicines in the Amazon rainforest. It sheds light on the broader context of plant medicine practices and indigenous traditions.

bottom of page